agitate


agitate
[c]/ˈædʒəteɪt / (say 'ajuhtayt)

verb (agitated, agitating)
verb (t)
1. to move or force into irregular action; shake or move: *A sigh of relief, the merest of zephyrs, coming from thirty listeners, was just sufficient to agitate the buttercups. –ethel anderson, 1956.
2. to move to and fro; impart regular motion to: *electrons flowing from ships masts agitate neighbouring air molecules, thus producing strong coronal light –murray stott, 1984.
3. to disturb, or excite into tumult; perturb: her mind was agitated by various emotions.
4. to call attention to by speech or writing; discuss; debate: to agitate the question.
verb (i)
5. to arouse or attempt to arouse public feeling as in some political or social question: *a speech structured on the classic formula of `agitate, educate, legislate' and appealing to the deepest emotions of the trade union movement –blanche d'alpuget, 1982; *Both officers and men began almost at once to agitate for free land. –al grassby and marji hill, 1988.
{Latin agitātus, past participle, aroused, excited}
agitated, adjective
agitatedly, adverb

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Agitate — Ag i*tate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Agitated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Agitating}.] [L. agitatus, p. p. of agitare to put in motion, fr. agere to move: cf. F. agiter. See {Act}, {Agent}.] 1. To move with a violent, irregular action; as, the wind agitates… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • agitate — [v1] shake physically beat, churn, concuss, convulse, disturb, rock, rouse, stir, toss; concept 152 Ant. calm, lull, quiet, soothe, tranquilize agitate [v2] disturb, trouble someone alarm, argue, arouse, bug*, bug up*, burn up*, confuse, craze*,… …   New thesaurus

  • agitate — ► VERB 1) make troubled or nervous. 2) campaign to arouse public concern about an issue. 3) stir or disturb (a liquid) briskly. DERIVATIVES agitation noun. ORIGIN Latin agitare agitate, drive …   English terms dictionary

  • agitate — [aj′i tāt΄] vt. agitated, agitating [< L agitatus, pp. of agitare, to put in motion < agere, ACT1] 1. a) to move violently b) to stir up or shake up 2. to excite or disturb the feelings of …   English World dictionary

  • agitate — I (activate) verb actuate, arouse, coax, electrify, energize, excite, exhort, ferment, foment, goad, impel, incite, induce, inflame, influence, inspire, inspirit, instigate, irritate, kindle, persuade, prompt, provoke, roil, rouse, spur,… …   Law dictionary

  • agitate — (v.) 1580s, to disturb, from L. agitatus, pp. of agitare to put in constant motion, drive onward, impel, frequentative of agere to move, drive (see AGITATION (Cf. agitation)). Literal sense of move to and fro, shake is from 1590s. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • agitate — 1 *shake, rock, convulse Analogous words: *stir, rouse, arouse: *move, actuate, drive, impel Antonyms: quiet, lull, still 2 perturb, *discompose, upset, fluster, flurry, disturb, disquiet Analogous words: * …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • agitate — [16] Agitate is one of a host of English words descended ultimately from Latin agere (see AGENT). Among the many meanings of agere was ‘drive, move’, and a verb derived from it denoting repeated action, agitāre, hence meant ‘move to and fro’.… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • agitate — [16] Agitate is one of a host of English words descended ultimately from Latin agere (see AGENT). Among the many meanings of agere was ‘drive, move’, and a verb derived from it denoting repeated action, agitāre, hence meant ‘move to and fro’.… …   Word origins

  • agitate — v. 1) to agitate strongly 2) (D; intr.) to agitate against; for (they were agitating for reform) * * * [ ædʒɪteɪt] for (they were agitateing for reform) (D; intr.) to agitate against to agitate strongly …   Combinatory dictionary